This is the Digest from 2002 for the Category of: Spock Pairing


3Crossing the Desert
This was based on a challenge to put your favorite pair through the crossing the desert/finding the hut scene in an Enterprise episode that produced some lovely stories. Certainly Spock and Christine are a favorite pair of mine when they are written like this--with Djinn's scintillating wit. The story is utterly charming, light, and sweet--but not too sweet. There's always a line in a Djinn story that's wryly authentic about men and women in love. I love the line where Chapel complains she's experiencing her dearest fantasy and isn't in any shape to appreciate it. Djinn's Chapel is never a sap and is always fun to spend your time with. The dialogue crackles here and both Chapel and Spock seem spot on and play well against each other. Though the best line is the last word given here to McCoy.
-- Rabble Rouser - Sat, 01 Mar 2003 17:32:02 -0500

4Dream Until Your Dream Comes True
"Dream Until Your Dream Comes True" is a haunting story, very vividly written, that, as alluded to in the summary, is a cautionary tale about being careful what you wish for. "Dream Until Your Dream Comes True" is definitely a subversive story, which is a great deal of what I like so much about it. Djinn takes dead aim at the Vulcan mystique and strips it of its romance by cleverly inverting fan fiction cliches and assumptions. In fact, I think her scenario is far more realistic about what it would be like to have a unbreakable bond with someone dedicated to non-emotion who could rifle through your head at will, than the romantic/ecstatic take we usually get on it (and perhaps all the more remarkable because when Djinn wants to there's no one better at showing what could be attractive about such a bond). This is definitely not what people expect in a Spock/Chapel story. As usual, I'm amazed at the changes Djinn rings on a supposedly "minor" character, bringing to life yet another version of Christine plausible within canon yet distinctly different from others in her works. I like how the ending circles back to the beginning and how again and again this story is just not what you expected on any level.
-- Rabble Rouser - Sat, 01 Mar 2003 17:35:46 -0500

5Gotterdammerung
In this latest installment of her Slayer Series, Djinn finally lets the shoe drop. It's not as if the title doesn't warn you. I have said of her Carter series that a lot of what I liked so much about it was that it's a true series and that there are threads and arcs developed from story to story. That's no less true in Djinn's Slayer series. Djinn has always rung a lot of changes on Chapel. She's always strong, stronger than I can usually see in the canon Chapel and with none of the sappiness I do see--but the one in the Carter series is not the same you see in others--and this incarnation is darker than most. We've seen that in the other stories--Chapel's reserve and unwillingness to open up and tendency to go it alone and that all comes to a head here. The story features a love scene between Spock and Chapel as intense as any Djinn's written this year (and given her Kirk/Chapel and scenes in the Carter series that's saying a lot!). I thought I had read every single damn variation in creation on the meaning of the link between "bondmates" but Djinn surprised me with her take on it here. If for nothing else, that would make the story worth reading. But Djinn also writes a suspenseful, riveting story and brings to vivid life more than one original character that really captures the heart.
-- Rabble Rouser - Sat, 01 Mar 2003 17:38:11 -0500

6Growth
This story--like so many of Saavant's--is just simply brilliant. I have never read a better explanation for the physical changes between the Saavik of Kirstie Alley and that of Robin Curtis. In fact, before this I've never even seen anyone attempt one. And within that fascinating take, Saavant also weaves a wonderful Saavik point of view tale of her grief post-Wrath of Khan and the changes it brings. Very nice Kirk and McCoy in the story too. The story is lovely and when Saavik speaks of feeling Spock's soul through McCoy's touch, I got chills. Most of all, what I read here was a fascinatingly developed, well-thought out Saavik as good as any I've read in fan fiction and one very capable of touching the heart. I'm generally not a fan of Spock and Saavik as a romantic pairing, but Saavant very nicely blended the Spock as father/mentor with the touch of Spock as romantic figure without it feeling off to me. Well done. Saavant can take me wherever she wants to go when she writes this character. I hope we'll be reading many more such tales by her in the future.
-- Rabble Rouser - Sat, 01 Mar 2003 17:41:57 -0500

7Here Be Dragons
Each Carter this year has something to savor that makes it unique. With "The Way by Moonlight" it was it's interesting aliens, while "A Matter of Life and Death" ripped your heart out, and "It's Always Something" teased you with its twists and turns. In this chapter there was the pleasure of visiting some old friends because here the focus was not on the crew of the Carter, but the old Enterprise crew as they come together again under sad circumstances. It was lovely to see Djinn's portrayal of our old favorites like McCoy, Uhura, Sulu, and Rand. Each was written with evident fondness and Djinn's so good at nailing each voice and bringing them to life. She also does something very risky with her characters here. Lets just say that this Chapel, so strong in many ways is not perfect. But then that's part of the appeal even when she does something less than endearing. Djinn ruthlessly exposes her characters and spares them little. She makes them living, breathing people who are not always heroic. The story has a bit of everything. Sad and moving, funny touches, one of the most intense, yet not at all explicit, love scenes Iíve read in fanfic, and yet not just a strong entry in itself but one that further logically develops the threads of earlier stories.
-- Rabble Rouser - Sat, 01 Mar 2003 17:46:08 -0500

9The Mark of Helguard
I like how Saavant establishes Saavik's voice and the theme of the story from the start, as well as the imaginative background including the mark itself so key to the story in several ways. The story certainly features a memorable villain and an intriguing duel and I loved the role the entire family played in solving the puzzle at the center of the story. I enjoyed this story, which had all the hallmarks that make Saavant's stories special, from her love of wordplay and puzzles, to her stylish way with narrative, to her unique perspective on the alien within and sheer cleverness.
-- Rabble Rouser - Sat, 01 Mar 2003 17:48:28 -0500

10A Matter of Life & Death
This is my favorite of Djinn's Carter stories in a series that seems to go from strength to strength. For one thing, it did something that even the best stories rarely extract from me--it made me cry. The story starts right out with one of the biggest fanfic cliches in the roster--one so hoary it would be almost impossible to take seriously in lesser hands. Yet Djinn manages to hang a tale on it that is moving and takes seriously the kind of consequences it would engender by staying true to her characters. Djinn creates a absorbing dynamic between Spock, Chapel, and her original character, Colonel Kerr, and here the original character manages to more than hold his own. She makes me truly feel for Kerr here who strives to do the right thing even knowing the cost he is going to pay. Djinn also does something gutsy here (and even more so in future stories) in making Chapel less than perfect. Then, when you are sure you know exactly what this story is about, the author turns around and hits you with what you arenít expecting. Once again, Djinn also creates a fascinating "guest star" in the priestess T'Clev you can only hope might be seen again as well as further developing her "regulars" among the crew like Nako--and Penhallon, who here began to really grow on me. Wonderful storytelling here in every way.
-- Rabble Rouser - Sat, 01 Mar 2003 17:53:31 -0500

11Next Evil Thing
Even though when I first read this story I had never watched Buffy, I found it very enjoyable. I rolled my eyes a bit at the premise--Chapel as Vampire Slayer--then found myself completely engrossed nevertheless. I think it works because while injecting the Buffyverse into Trek, Djinn never loses sight of who these characters are. I like how Djinn deepens Chapel character here with a slice of back story we never saw on the series while Spock very much remains Spock. And in a sense this isn't a true crossover--no Buffyverse character appears in it. Instead Chapel finds in the Enterprise command crew her own group of "scoobies." But in the end this is a story that works on pure storytelling ability--it's just a plain good, fun yarn.
-- Rabble Rouser - Sat, 01 Mar 2003 17:56:29 -0500

15Utoto
Utoto features an interesting take on Perrin. For me, the most striking passage in the story said a lot about the appeal of Wildcat's S/U series as a whole. Perrin looks Spock up in the database and finds pictures of him and Uhura literally getting closer and closer to each other as they grow older over the years. It's a powerful image that speaks volumes of the strength of their relationship and the strength of the series. It was poignant to read of Uhura aging, slowing down, as we move closer to her last years. And few capture Spock's voice so well or has such a deft narrative gift as Wildcat.
-- Rabble Rouser - Sat, 01 Mar 2003 17:59:26 -0500

10A Matter of Life & Death
Yet another Carter story. It was only a matter of time until the 'triangle' with Chapel, Spock and Kerr came to a head, despite the appearance of having it all settled in the last couple of stories. One might think that using the convention of Spock's pon farr was predictable, but Kerr's reaction was clearly based on his fear of Chapel's *emotional* commitment to Spock. All of the principals' reactions were right on the nose, without ever resorting to cliches or allowing anyone to take the easy way out.
-- Rocky - Sun, 02 Mar 2003 07:21:30 -0500

3Crossing the Desert
I like this spunky Chapel and particularly appreciate how, even in a standard h/c scenario, she still manages to come across as a strong character instead of a wilting lily. Great repartee between Chapel and Spock throughout, but McCoy unquestionably gets the best line at the end.
-- Rocky - Sun, 02 Mar 2003 07:22:23 -0500

4Dream Until Your Dream Comes True
This is a classic 'be careful what you wish for' tale--on several levels, even though the full horror of that statement doesn't hit home until the very end.
-- Rocky - Sun, 02 Mar 2003 07:23:03 -0500

7Here Be Dragons
This story saw an inevitable 'coming to a head' of events, namely the unstable triangle between Chapel, Kerr and Spock. Who among us didn't expect that Spock--and Chapel--wouldn't be able to just forget the feelings that had been stirred up a short time before by Spock's pon farr and more importantly the death of his mother? Yes, she 'chose' Kerr, but this isn't a decision to be made once and never revisited. Especially with circumstances constantly forcing her to reconsider what it is she truly wants.
-- Rocky - Sun, 02 Mar 2003 07:23:58 -0500

15Utoto
I never grow tired of reading about Spock and Uhura, as there is always another aspect of their relationship, another nuance to the characters, for Wildcat to bring out. In this latest story, here is a couple that has known the joys of growing old together, who are perfectly at ease with each other and yet this familiarity breeds comfort, not contempt. More than ever I see the two of them as two halves of a unified whole, especially in the gardening scene at the end while Sarek's bonding to Perrin is taking place. And I see how much Uhura has grown, knowing exactly what Spock needed her to do that he couldn't do himself--namely go to his father at his parents' house one last time in effort to bridge the gap between father and son--and yet she knew when she could do no more, when it wasn't worth fighting any more. Spock may have been surprised at first that Uhura didn't insist they attend the bonding anyway, but upon reflection he knew why she didn't. Once upon a time, early in their relationship, he viewed Uhura as the one who pushed him in directions he didn't necessarily want or feel he needed to go, but he has long since realized that she doesn't push without reason, and understands all too well his limits as well as her own. This is, more than anything else, emblematic of just how close these two are, how much they implicitly trust and rely on each other. It was a pleasure seeing Saavik again, grown into the mature, confident woman we always knew she would one day be. I still miss the little girl, but her son Derek (and I love how it's at once an almost Vulcan name as well as a Human one) is a fun character in his own right. He is not at all like his mother at this age, but he is just as full of life. Wildcat has portrayed the young teenage male perfectly. Even the minor details are so right. And just like in "Thaya", some of the details thrown in almost as an aside are hysterical, like the Betazed version of "Baywatch." I also loved seeing Uhura with him, how she got through his adolescent armor, and was able to find a series of interests and activities that they could both share. Spock also handled his 'grandson' well--I can just see him showing Derek the various moves and positions with the same air of gravity as he once pored over a book of seashell classifications with Saavik. I very much am looking forward to seeing the 'missing years' between "Thaya" and "Utoto" filled in with future stories, and continuing to see the develoment of one of my favorite families through the generations.Which brings me to the heart of this story, Sarek and Perrin. I never took to Perrin when she was introduced on TNG; she seemed cold, distant, in major contrast to Amanda whose warmth and graciousness were just so evident. Canon never really explained to us why Sarek remarried after such a long time after Amanda's death, or how and why he chose another Human wife. Wildcat does an admirable job of filling in the gaps. Sarek's reflection over the painting that had used to belong to Amanda really brought home how he felt, and how he got to this moment of time and was perhaps more susceptible to Perrin's 'charms.' His emotions were conveyed very well. The way the story ended left me sad, but it couldn't have been any other way. We know how Sarek's story will eventually end--the Bendii's syndrome, the loss of emotional control, with just his cold, aloof wife to stand by his side, but not being able to truly be there for him, not able to help him or even advise a better course of action, an alternative way of dealing with his difficulties. Amanda, and Uhura, would have been capable of so much more.
-- Rocky - Sun, 02 Mar 2003 07:26:34 -0500

6Growth
This is a wonderfully clever story and I'm going to try to do the feedback justice without spoiling anything. Suffice it to say that this is explains something that no one ever tried to explain, as far as I know, and does it in a way that gives full respect to grief and sadness and being lost after losing someone. Even months after first reading it, it is very clear in my mind. And to me that is the mark of an excellent story.
-- Djinn - Mon, 03 Mar 2003 22:49:47 -0500

3Crossing the Desert
Normally S/Ch is NOT my pairing ;) but Djinn can once again sell my a story with them. I like the Q&A game they play, and found the whole setting very believable and fitting. Thanks, Djinn.
-- Acidqueen - Mon, 10 Mar 2003 03:58:23 -0500

3Crossing the Desert
I chose "Crossing the Desert" by Djinn for TOS Spock pairing because it is very well-written, and also a good look at Spock and Christine's relationship. Also, Djinn characterizes both Christine and Spock well, and doesn't make Christine the sappy, wimpy insubordinate she's often made out to be. All in all, "Crossing the Desert" is the best Spock/Christine story I've read in quite a while.
-- Nevfennasiel - Tue, 11 Mar 2003 00:11:43 -0500

4Dream Until Your Dream Comes True
This one is dark. Way dark. Djinn dark. It's not your mother's Spock/Chapel romance. Djinn does a wonderful job of knocking the "wouldn't it be dreamy to be bonded to Spock for all eternity" myth right on it's keister. The lengths Chapel goes to in trying to cope with such forced intimacy, physical and otherwise, are extreme to say the least. Once again, Djinn gives us a strong, defiant, yet extraordinarily damaged Chapel that you can still reconcile with the limited exposure the character received in canon.
-- Kath - Thu, 13 Mar 2003 08:38:59 -0500

5Gotterdammerung
This is the latest in Djinn's "Christine the Vampire Slayer" series. A bizarre premis, but it actually works. The darkness that was hinted at in "Set in Stone" comes to fruition in this story. Chapel's downward spiral is agonizing to watch, and it's harder still to watch the effects on those around her. Joss Whedon himself couldn't have written a more realistically self destructive character. This story has angst, humor, romance, and an impending apocalypse. What more could anyone want?
-- Kath - Thu, 13 Mar 2003 08:44:55 -0500

7Here Be Dragons
You know you are reading a wonderful story when the good guys are becoming convincing bad guys, while the characters you dismissed on the fist few outings are showing flashes of hidden nobility and character. Yes, we are back aboard the good ship Carter. Djinn has given us some wonderful original characters in this story where no one is exactly what you've been led to beleive they are. Chapel and Spock do swan dives off their pedastels in this emotionally messy tale, but they just do it so darn well. I wanted them to not be held accountable for their actions, although I know the other shoe will eventually drop.
-- Kath - Thu, 13 Mar 2003 08:53:09 -0500

10A Matter of Life & Death
You know it's going to be one hell of a ride when pon farr is only the tip of the iceberg. Extra snaps to Djinn for taking the "We're trapped and Spock has that look in his eye" cliche and making it into more of a space age bodice-ripper story. The range of emotions and motivations for Spock, Chapel, and Kerr (who's quickly becoming my favorite original character EVER) are contradictory and as real as you get. No one does emotional aftermath peppered with humor and witty dialogue as well as Djinn.
-- Kath - Thu, 13 Mar 2003 08:58:20 -0500

11Next Evil Thing
TOS meets "Buffy the Vampire Slayer"? OMIGOD, Djinn actually makes this loopy premise work, and work well. It seems there's a lot that the command crew of the Enterprise doesn't about their head nurse, but they learn quickly when they beam down to a planet that has been a feeding ground for vampires. Christine's history is plausible and well written, and Djinn has shown a real talent for writing nail-biting action sequences. Couple that with her tight dialogue and wry humor, and you have a winner!
-- Kath - Thu, 13 Mar 2003 09:05:02 -0500

4Dream Until Your Dream Comes True
This one is a Christine and Spock pairing as dark as pitch, and a strong warning to be very careful what you wish for. Christine got hers, and so did Spock.
-- Paula - Sat, 15 Mar 2003 17:13:53 -0500

3Crossing the Desert
Spock endeavors to keep Chapel alive while they struggle to survive in a desert -- another of the outstanding responses to a challenge to rewrite Enterprise's "Desert Crossing" in another series. Romantic and very enjoyable, and the ending is just perfect!
-- Ventura33 - Sat, 15 Mar 2003 19:26:35 -0500

4Dream Until Your Dream Comes True
Oh man, is this story twisted or what? Djinn skillfully inverts all of the Spock/Chapel cliches with merciless precision as she shows us an embittered, trapped Christine who definitely should have been more careful what she wished for. Angst reigns supreme here! And the ending is evil beyond words!
-- Ventura33 - Sat, 15 Mar 2003 19:30:22 -0500

7Here Be Dragons
A dark story with murder on the Enterprise, a funeral, and Christine trying to fight her way out of depression. But she has Spock, not to mention another lover, to help her through it. (Come on, Djinn, when are you going to give us a rip-roaring threesome? We're all impatiently waiting!)
-- Ventura33 - Sat, 15 Mar 2003 19:35:33 -0500

9The Mark of Helguard
Saavik and Spock are faced with a bizarre puzzle. A very well crafted story from a writer whose unique perspective on Vulcans always makes for some interesting reading.
-- Ventura33 - Sat, 15 Mar 2003 19:39:34 -0500

11Next Evil Thing
Christine the Vampire Slayer faces another battle with the forces of evil as her (kinda dense) shipmates figure out there's something a bit different about her. But of course, she prevails! I am frankly envious of what Djinn's fertile imagination can manage to come up with.
-- Ventura33 - Sat, 15 Mar 2003 19:44:08 -0500

14Twelfth Night
This was a fun and romantic story, with a bit of holiday mystery to enjoy! Good one.
-- Ventura33 - Sat, 15 Mar 2003 19:47:20 -0500

10A Matter of Life & Death
Oh, this was fun! No one can twist and reshuffle those old fanfic cliches like Djinn! Spock's in pon farr and Christine is trapped in a cave with him -- but this isn't what she always dreamed of. In fact, she already has a boyfriend, but what's to be done?
-- Ventura33 - Sat, 15 Mar 2003 19:53:36 -0500

5Gotterdammerung
Whoo! Another dark, creepy Christine the Vampire Slayer story, as the forces of evil are gathering for the last battle. Christine doesn't want to be the hero, but, of course, she doesn't have much of a choice. The angst is so well done here, as is the vamp-dusting action. Excellent!
-- Ventura33 - Sat, 15 Mar 2003 19:59:04 -0500

15Utoto
This is a very scary view of Perrin, a young woman who sees everything in terms of herself. It's not just an interesting character study, but also a believeable explanation for the rift between Sarek and Spock. Very well done.
-- Penny Proctor - Sat, 15 Mar 2003 20:47:59 -0500